A dedicated hub of information promoting awareness of Africa's female leadership traditions including Rain Queen Mothers, Queen Mothers, Queens, Priestesses, Shaman Healers, Warriors and their associated roles, customs and history.
The Rain Queen and the Lobedu: A North Sotho Tribe

The Rain Queen and the Lobedu: A North Sotho Tribe

The Balobedu (Ba Lobedu - Ba gaModjadji) are a Bantu tribe of the Northern Sotho group, with strong affinities to the Venda, or Vhavhenda, to the north. They have their own kingdom, in the district of Balobedu - Limpopo Province - South Africa. The Lobedu Kingdom comprises over 150 villages....
Modjadji V, Rain Queen

Modjadji V, Rain Queen

TweetSouth Africa: Queen Modjadji V has thirty-three wives. She is not allowed to marry men, but must choose her “wives” among the eldest daughters of the Lovedu people, while her dynasty has ruled for two centuries. Modjadji V the Rain Queen has mystical rainmaking powers. The Zulu have always feared...
The Power of Women in West Africa: Queen Mothers

The Power of Women in West Africa: Queen Mothers

For West Africa, one aspect remains consistent: the African people have a very different approach to power among women than the traditional western conception implies. When people in the West consider the concept of equality between the sexes, they think of men and women sharing equal roles in society....
The Queen Mother and the Golden Stool of Ashanti

The Queen Mother and the Golden Stool of Ashanti

The Golden Stool is a mysterious symbol of power and history of the Ashanti people. The myth is told that Okomfo Anokye conjured the famous Golden Stool from the sky and landed it on the lap of King Osei Tutu, the first King of the Ashantis.
The Warrior Queens of Dahomey

The Warrior Queens of Dahomey

The kingdom of Dahomey, now called Republique du Benin is located in Western Africa, bordered by Togo on the west and Nigeria on the east. Dahomey has a unique feature in its history that reads like something out of Greek mythology - they had Africa's most well known corps of...

The Lovedu Rain Queen

The Rain Queen is an integral part of Lovedu culture and history. Oral traditions have the Lovedu being formed by Dzugudini – the daughter of the chief of the Monomotapa (part of the Karanga Empire) who were based near Maulwi in Zimbabwe. The Mudjadji is considered to be the living embodiment of the rain goddess and is also known by the title Khifidola-maru-a-Daja ('transformer of clouds'). She is considered the embodiment of the rain, guarantor of the yearly seasonal cycle, and her very emotions are said to be paralleled by the weather. Amongst her other royal duties she presides over an annual rain ceremony held each November.
Latest entries

The Mudjadji dynasty : the principles of female leadership in African cosmology

The primary aim of the study was to investigate the principles of female leadership in southern Africa, with special reference to the Mudjadji cosmology. The process involved tracing the origins of these principles back to Ancient Ethiopia
The Power of Ancestors

The Power of Ancestors

The royal village of Khetlhakone clings to the green hillside below the Modjadji Nature Reserve. This little-known national park in the subtropical province of Limpopo is named after a dynasty of Rain Queens. Their magical power has ensured the well-being of the local Balobedu people since the 19th century.
Women on the Left: Funmilayo Anikulapo-Kuti

Women on the Left: Funmilayo Anikulapo-Kuti

Funmilayo Anikulapo-Kuti, born in 1900, was the Nigerian daughter of a returned slave who lived in the Yuroba Region. Well educated with a colonial education and a Christian background, she was radicalised through the actions of the British occupation of Nigeria: its racism, sexism and economic violence.

Aba Women’s Riots (November-December 1929)

The "riots" or the war, led by women in the provinces of Calabar and Owerri in southeastern Nigeria in November and December of 1929, became known as the "Aba Women's Riots of 1929" in British colonial history, or as the "Women's War" in Igbo history.
Seh-Dong-Hong-Beh of Abomey (Benin)

Seh-Dong-Hong-Beh of Abomey (Benin)

Leader of the Dahomey Amazons, she led an army of 6,000 women against the Egba fortress of Abeokuta. Because the Amazons were armed with spears, bows and swords while the Egba had European cannons only about 1,200 survived the extended battle.
Iyoba Idia: The Hidden Oba of Benin

Iyoba Idia: The Hidden Oba of Benin

TweetSourced: Nkiru Nzegwu. “Iyoba Idia: The Hidden Oba of Benin” JENDA: A Journal of Culture and African Women Studies: Issue 9, 2006. The task of piecing together women’s history has been difficult. So acute is the dearth of information, particularly documentary evidence, that some of the outstanding women in history have been mistaken for men...
Queen Idia, Mother of Esigie, the Oba of Benin

Queen Idia, Mother of Esigie, the Oba of Benin

Queen Idia was the mother of Esigie, the Oba of Benin who ruled from 1504 to 1550. She played a very significant role in the rise and reign of her son. She was a strong warrior who fought relentlessly before and during her son's reign as the Oba (king) of the Edo people.

The Important World Shamanic Healing Work of Rain Queen Mother

Rain Queen Mother is a Namwign Bea – or a Bosom Mba - this translates into English as a Child of a Nature Deity. She is one of a few practicing Lunar Shaman Rain Queen Mothers from West Africa, who works all over the World healing the Earth and people. According to the Elder Diviners...

Rain Queen Mother

When Rain Queen Mother first arrived in the village of her Great, Great, Great Grandmother to begin her Initiation in 1998, her Elders told her that her way - meaning her path, was truly Ancestral. She would never have been able to find her way home if it were not for the fact that her...

Nzinga of Ndongo and Matamba

TweetFrom Wikipedia Nzinga Mbande (c. 1583 – December 17, 1663), also known as Ana de Sousa Nzinga Mbande, was a 17th century queen (muchino a muhatu) of the Ndongo and Matamba Kingdoms of the Mbundu people in southwestern Africa. Early life Queen Nzinga was born to Ngola (King) Kiluanji and Kangela in 1583. According to...
Seh-Dong-Hong-Beh an Amazon in the Dahoman army

Seh-Dong-Hong-Beh an Amazon in the Dahoman army

TweetImage Reference forbesamazon Source Frederick E. Forbes, Dahomey and the Dahomans: being the journals of two missions to the king of Dahomey, and residence in his capital, in . . . 1849 and 1850 (London, 1851), vol. 1, facing p. 23 Comments Caption, “Seh-Dong-Hong-Beh. An Amazon in the Dahoman army.” Image shows her in war...

African Women in Revolution

This book is an ambitious, extensive and detailed analysis of the roles played by African women in seven revolutionary movements in post World War 11 Africa. The revolutionary movements covered in this book occurred in: Algeria, Kenya, Guinea-Bissau, Mozambique, Angola, Zimbabwe, and South Africa.