A dedicated hub of information promoting awareness of Africa's female leadership traditions including Rain Queen Mothers, Queen Mothers, Queens, Priestesses, Shaman Healers, Warriors and their associated roles, customs and history.
The Rain Queen and the Lobedu: A North Sotho Tribe

The Rain Queen and the Lobedu: A North Sotho Tribe

The Balobedu (Ba Lobedu - Ba gaModjadji) are a Bantu tribe of the Northern Sotho group, with strong affinities to the Venda, or Vhavhenda, to the north. They have their own kingdom, in the district of Balobedu - Limpopo Province - South Africa. The Lobedu Kingdom comprises over 150 villages....
Modjadji V, Rain Queen

Modjadji V, Rain Queen

TweetSouth Africa: Queen Modjadji V has thirty-three wives. She is not allowed to marry men, but must choose her “wives” among the eldest daughters of the Lovedu people, while her dynasty has ruled for two centuries. Modjadji V the Rain Queen has mystical rainmaking powers. The Zulu have always feared...
The Power of Women in West Africa: Queen Mothers

The Power of Women in West Africa: Queen Mothers

For West Africa, one aspect remains consistent: the African people have a very different approach to power among women than the traditional western conception implies. When people in the West consider the concept of equality between the sexes, they think of men and women sharing equal roles in society....
The Queen Mother and the Golden Stool of Ashanti

The Queen Mother and the Golden Stool of Ashanti

The Golden Stool is a mysterious symbol of power and history of the Ashanti people. The myth is told that Okomfo Anokye conjured the famous Golden Stool from the sky and landed it on the lap of King Osei Tutu, the first King of the Ashantis.
The Warrior Queens of Dahomey

The Warrior Queens of Dahomey

The kingdom of Dahomey, now called Republique du Benin is located in Western Africa, bordered by Togo on the west and Nigeria on the east. Dahomey has a unique feature in its history that reads like something out of Greek mythology - they had Africa's most well known corps of...

The Lovedu Rain Queen

The Rain Queen is an integral part of Lovedu culture and history. Oral traditions have the Lovedu being formed by Dzugudini – the daughter of the chief of the Monomotapa (part of the Karanga Empire) who were based near Maulwi in Zimbabwe. The Mudjadji is considered to be the living embodiment of the rain goddess and is also known by the title Khifidola-maru-a-Daja ('transformer of clouds'). She is considered the embodiment of the rain, guarantor of the yearly seasonal cycle, and her very emotions are said to be paralleled by the weather. Amongst her other royal duties she presides over an annual rain ceremony held each November.
Latest entries

Women’s Medicine: Zar-bori Cult in Africa and Beyond

Despite the large-scale destruction of traditional practices throughout the world, the Zar-Bori spirit-healing cult continues to hold tremendous meaning for some women in West Africa, the Sudan and North Africa, and even in the more progressive countries such as Tunisia, Kuwait, Egypt and the Gulf States.

Bori Religion and the Bori Priestess

Bori is a traditional animistic religion of the Hausa people of West Africa. An aspect of the traditional Maguzawa Hausa religious traditions, Bori became a state religion led by ruling class priestesses amongst some of the late pre-colonial Hausa States.

Amazons of Black Sparta: Women Warriors of Dahomey

This volume examines the "Amazons", whose existence has been verified via documents and eye-witness accounts from battles for the West African kingdom of Dahomey in the 18th and 19th centuries. Originally palace guards, the Amazons had evolved by the 1760s into professional troops armed mainly with muskets, machetes and clubs.

The Realm of a Rain Queen: A Study of the Pattern of Lovedu Society

This important work embodies the results of an investigation into the everyday life, culture and religion of the Lovedu, perhaps the least known of all South African tribes.

Queens, Queen Mothers, Priestesses and Power: Case Studies in African Gender

A collection of 18 case studies of women in power in Africa. It focuses on the political and ritual roles of royal and elite women who are gathered together by tradition, choice and circumstance, and who, as a result, achieve and exercise power, and acquire and exert influence in the public and private arenas of...
Adioukrou African Queen Mother

Adioukrou African Queen Mother

TweetIn Ghana, the display of gold at the Ashanti king’s jubilee in 1995 was unsurpassed in splendor. This Adioukrou Queen Mother, attending the jubilee, indicates her status by wearing gold turtle & crocodile talismans in her hair. Magnificently bedecked in gold jewelry & wearing gold dust makeup, she exhibits her husband’s substantial authority & worth....
Queen Mother Nana Yaa Asantewaa

Queen Mother Nana Yaa Asantewaa

TweetShe was born in 1863 at Ejisu, near Kumasi, in Ashanti and later became the queen Mother of Ejisu, Brave and fearless as she was, she led the men of Ashanti or the Ashanti Warriors” to fight the British.when the Asantehene (Ashanti King), Nana Prempeh and other important chiefs were captured and sent to the...
Modjadji, The Rain Queen

Modjadji, The Rain Queen

The Lovedu tribe (also called the Balobedu), a Sotho-Venda group that in 1500 settled in the north of what is now the Limpopo Province of South Africa, has the distinction that it is the only tribe in Africa still ruled by a female monarch.

Information on the Queen Mother Tradition among the Kwahu People of Ghana

The Kwahu are a main constituent kingdom of the Akan ethnic group. The Akan reside in clusters in southern and central Ghana, and the Kwahu reside in the eastern central part of the country. The common language of the Akan kingdoms is Akan, which has many dialects.

Mbuya Nehanda a.k.a Charwe Nyakasikana: “My bones shall rise again”

In the Chidamba Village lived the famous Shona spirit medium Mbuya Nehanda. She was a powerful woman spirit medium that was committed to upholding traditional Shona culture, she was instrumental in organizing the nationwide resistance to colonial rule during the First Chimurenga of 1896-7.
The Power of a Queen Mother

The Power of a Queen Mother

Unlike most Western civilizations the female in West African cultures can hold a great deal of power, especially in the position of Queen Mother. Historians view West African Queen Mothers as: "History's most politically viable female population".

Rain Queen, from Wikipedia

The Modjadji or Rain Queen is the hereditary queen of Balobedu, a people of the Limpopo Province of South Africa. The succession to the position of Rain Queen is matrilineal, meaning that the Queen's eldest daughter is the heir, and that males are not entitled to inherit the throne at all. The Rain Queen is...