A dedicated hub of information promoting awareness of Africa's female leadership traditions including Rain Queen Mothers, Queen Mothers, Queens, Priestesses, Shaman Healers, Warriors and their associated roles, customs and history.
Posts tagged "African monarchy"
The Power of Ancestors

The Power of Ancestors

The royal village of Khetlhakone clings to the green hillside below the Modjadji Nature Reserve. This little-known national park in the subtropical province of Limpopo is named after a dynasty of Rain Queens. Their magical power has ensured the well-being of the local Balobedu people since the 19th century.
Iyoba Idia: The Hidden Oba of Benin

Iyoba Idia: The Hidden Oba of Benin

TweetSourced: Nkiru Nzegwu. “Iyoba Idia: The Hidden Oba of Benin” JENDA: A Journal of Culture and African Women Studies: Issue 9, 2006. The task of piecing together women’s history has been difficult. So acute is the dearth of information, particularly documentary evidence, that some of the outstanding women in history have been mistaken for men...

The Queenmother, Matriarchy and the Question of Female Political Authority

The Queenmother, Matriarchy, and the Question of Female Political Authority in Precolonial West African Monarchy Journal of Black Studies 1997 27: 579-597. By Tarikhu Farrar

Queen Mother Yaa Asantewaa

Yaa Asantewaa was an Edwesohemaa (Queen Mother of the Edweso tribe of the Asante) in modern day Ghana. She is often credited with empowering the people to rise up against the British.
The Queen Mother and the Golden Stool of Ashanti

The Queen Mother and the Golden Stool of Ashanti

The Golden Stool is a mysterious symbol of power and history of the Ashanti people. The myth is told that Okomfo Anokye conjured the famous Golden Stool from the sky and landed it on the lap of King Osei Tutu, the first King of the Ashantis.
The Warrior Queens of Dahomey

The Warrior Queens of Dahomey

The kingdom of Dahomey, now called Republique du Benin is located in Western Africa, bordered by Togo on the west and Nigeria on the east. Dahomey has a unique feature in its history that reads like something out of Greek mythology - they had Africa's most well known corps of female warriors.