A dedicated hub of information promoting awareness of Africa's female leadership traditions including Rain Queen Mothers, Queen Mothers, Queens, Priestesses, Shaman Healers, Warriors and their associated roles, customs and history.
Posts tagged "West Africa"
Seh-Dong-Hong-Beh of Abomey (Benin)

Seh-Dong-Hong-Beh of Abomey (Benin)

Leader of the Dahomey Amazons, she led an army of 6,000 women against the Egba fortress of Abeokuta. Because the Amazons were armed with spears, bows and swords while the Egba had European cannons only about 1,200 survived the extended battle.
Iyoba Idia: The Hidden Oba of Benin

Iyoba Idia: The Hidden Oba of Benin

TweetSourced: Nkiru Nzegwu. “Iyoba Idia: The Hidden Oba of Benin” JENDA: A Journal of Culture and African Women Studies: Issue 9, 2006. The task of piecing together women’s history has been difficult. So acute is the dearth of information, particularly documentary evidence, that some of the outstanding women in history have been mistaken for men...

The Important World Shamanic Healing Work of Rain Queen Mother

Rain Queen Mother is a Namwign Bea – or a Bosom Mba - this translates into English as a Child of a Nature Deity. She is one of a few practicing Lunar Shaman Rain Queen Mothers from West Africa, who works all over the World healing the Earth and people. According to the Elder Diviners...

The Queenmother, Matriarchy and the Question of Female Political Authority

The Queenmother, Matriarchy, and the Question of Female Political Authority in Precolonial West African Monarchy Journal of Black Studies 1997 27: 579-597. By Tarikhu Farrar

Female Song Tradition and the Akan of Ghana: The Creative Process in Nnwonkoro

Nnwonkoro is a genre of women's song found among the Akan speaking peoples of Ghana. Based on extensive field work this book investigates the nature of composition in oral culture, together with issues such as the scope of the poetic imagination and the transformation process that accompany's modernisation.

African Matriarchal Foundations: The Igbo Case

The received anthropological view is that the Igbo are not a matriarchal society. This book is a contribution to this debate and the author uses a variety of lines to demonstrate her primary thesis: that Igbo societies are fundamentally matriarchal and have suffered an imposition of patriarchy upon it.

Amazons of Black Sparta: Women Warriors of Dahomey

This volume examines the "Amazons", whose existence has been verified via documents and eye-witness accounts from battles for the West African kingdom of Dahomey in the 18th and 19th centuries. Originally palace guards, the Amazons had evolved by the 1760s into professional troops armed mainly with muskets, machetes and clubs.
The Power of Women in West Africa: Queen Mothers

The Power of Women in West Africa: Queen Mothers

For West Africa, one aspect remains consistent: the African people have a very different approach to power among women than the traditional western conception implies. When people in the West consider the concept of equality between the sexes, they think of men and women sharing equal roles in society.
The Queen Mother and the Golden Stool of Ashanti

The Queen Mother and the Golden Stool of Ashanti

The Golden Stool is a mysterious symbol of power and history of the Ashanti people. The myth is told that Okomfo Anokye conjured the famous Golden Stool from the sky and landed it on the lap of King Osei Tutu, the first King of the Ashantis.
The Power of a Queen Mother

The Power of a Queen Mother

Unlike most Western civilizations the female in West African cultures can hold a great deal of power, especially in the position of Queen Mother. Historians view West African Queen Mothers as: "History's most politically viable female population".